Powroznik Keeps Second at Smith Lake

As posted on FLW.com

When you practice for a tournament, it helps to have a rough idea of the general size of the fish that reside on your primary areas. If you are Jacob Powroznik, you know the size of basically every fish that lives in the school you plan to fish. After Powroznik weighed in his 14-pound, 11-ounce limit on day one he mentioned that he would be able to catch 12 to 14 pounds every day. And did he ever back that up by catching 12-12, 12-3 and 13-11 over the last three days of the competition, respectively.

“That is one of those places you dream about finding,” said the Prince George, Va., native when referring to his fishing ground. “I did a lot of idling around in practice and when I found that school it looked like something you see on Kentucky Lake; there were hundreds of fish on it. For the fish to be that deep (47 to 50 feet) I knew they weren’t going anywhere.

“I knew I had found a good spot, but I had no idea it would be this good until the tournament started.”

Powroznik’s main spot was a long underwater point near the mouth of Simpson Creek. Throughout the week he alternated between a drop-shot and an umbrella rig (Swim N Frenzy). For his drop-shot setup, Powroznik used 10-pound braid with an 8-pound fluorocarbon leader attached to it. A 1/0-hook with a green pumpkin worm and either a 3/8-ounce or ¼-ounce tungsten weight finished off the drop-shot rig.

A closer look at second-place finisher Jacob Powroznik's umbrella rig, the Swim N’ Frenzy.As for the umbrella rig combo, his choices were an 8-foot Villain or 7-foot, 11-inch Veritas rod rigged with either braid or fluorocarbon. Powroznik thought he would receive more bites from the fluorocarbon, not because of visibility, but because it makes less noise than braid coming through the water. Light-wire hooks gave Powroznik the ability to simply straighten them out in an effort to get the rig unstuck from brush – though he still lost close to $200 worth of umbrella rigs this week.

“I wanted to wind to blow, but I didn’t want it to blow as hard as it did today. I had to leave my main area and basically start practicing again. That’s when I started to throw the umbrella rig in wind-blown areas and ended up catching two good ones from docks in the back of pockets.

Powroznik finished with a four-day total weight worth 53-5 and claimed a check for $35,000.

“If you would have told me when I left Virginia that would get second here, I would have been grinning from ear to ear all the way down. This place is just amazing. And If I was to move anywhere it would definitely be Alabama.”

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